Fill out the form below and you’ll receive the e-book in your mailbox.

Questions about compliance training this e-book answers

  • How can you ensure your compliance training is relevant, meaningful and effective?
  • Which stakeholders do you need to consider for your compliance training?
  • How can you support the learning professionals?
  • What role does (smart) technology play?
  • How do you create a healthy and sustainable compliance culture?

The paradox of compliance training

Let’s be honest: nobody seems to like compliance training. Many professionals experience compliance training as dull, irrelevant and meaningless. A regular ‘tick the box and move on as quickly as possible’-activity. Learning professionals, consultants, designers, providers, trainers, and facilitators often have a hard time receiving appreciation for all the work they do related to compliance training.

But on the other hand, as ‘regular people’, we care a lot about compliance. We want the medical staff that delivers our healthcare to be compliant. We want the pilot and crew who are in charge of the airplane we fly on to be compliant. We want the people who prepare our medication and food to be compliant. We also want our loved ones to return home safe and sound after a day at work. Welcome to what I call the ‘compliance training paradox’! Time to crack the compliance training code.
– Ger Driesen

About Ger Driesen: In his role as Learning Innovation Leader at aNewSpring, Ger’s focus is on inspiring the community of learning professionals, and be inspired by them. 

The compliance training e-book explores these four important topics

1.
How to peel the compliance training onion

First, we’ll teach you how to get to the core of compliance training and find other crucial layers.

2.
The regulation of behavior

This will help us to be crystal clear about where and when training can be helpful when it comes to compliance, and where and when it can’t!

3.
Smart use of learning technology

See some best practices of how others used learning technology in a smart way for effective and efficient compliance training.

4.
Compliance empowerment

We want to inspire you to build ‘compliance empowerment’ for more sustainable results and the creation of a healthy compliance culture.

Want to learn more?

Here are some interesting blogs from Ger to help you get started.

Ger’s Learning Notes #39 – Putting the learner at #1

While I was researching and curating this episode, I wondered about my own professional training to become a learning designer. I don’t recall that there was much focus on the user, back then, only in very general ways. I guess it is the legacy of Steve Jobs to put the user at the center of attention in design processes.

Nowadays, it has become the norm, and a standard even a ‘no-brainer’ in the expectation of users. Over the years, I found my way step by step to put the learner at the center of my learning design activities and during presentations and training. And to me, it made my work more interesting and rewarding.

I hope this episode of the learning notes helps you find your way in the area of learner centered design.

The ‘Jobs-to-be-Done’ approach: empathy that matters for learning eXperience design

The ‘Jobs-to-be-Done’ (JTBD) approach is a framework that has its origins in marketing and innovation. To set the scene, a well-known quote by business professor Theodore Levitt: ‘People don’t want a quarter-inch drill, they want a quarter-inch hole’.

Essentially the JTBD approach is very straightforward and focuses on what people aim to achieve, independent of the tools, services or support they use. In this article we’ll explore the JTBD framework and how it can be applied by learning designers.

Ger’s Learning Notes #38 – Jobs to be Done for Learnings design(ers)

Are you fond of milkshakes? In fact, I am. And even more since I heard the explanation by Clayton Christenson about why people ‘hire’ a milkshake. Clay gives a great explanation about Jobs to be Done via his fun and famous Milkshake example that you’ll find in this episode.

Although Jobs to be Done (JTBD) stems from Innovation literature, I think it has value for, and can easily be applied by learning designers. For sure if you want to apply design thinking principles such as the use of empathy.

I’d like to say: ‘JTBD is empathy on steroids’. See how it might help you and let me know about your experience when you tried.

Ger’s Learning Notes #37 – Inspiration from Award Judges

The previous learning note episode (#36) was about learning from award winners (aNewSpring Most Inspiring Learning Journey Awards 2021). This time, I’ve asked the judges of the awards to share their favourite resource with the ‘learning notes audience’. The four judges were Stella Collins, Nicole van de Ven – Smeelen, Michael Strawbridge and yours-truly. You’ll find their relevant resources in this edition of the learning notes.