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Ger’s Learning Notes #26 Learning techniques

By Ger Driesen

‘Never play when you practice and never practice when you play’. These are the words of top drummer, Thomas Lang, who started his professional career with the Austrian band Falco.

Practice is hard; it’s about trying to achieve something you haven’t mastered yet. That’s a frustrating process and for a bit of relief, we tend to stop practicing for a few minutes of play: applying something we have already mastered because that is satisfying. Don’t. Stick with your practice until you reach your goal. That’s what is called ‘deliberate practice’. It’s one of the learning techniques of this edition of the learning notes.

But there’s also ‘reinforcement’ (teaching pigeons how to play ping pong!), ‘chunking’ and ‘pruning’ as interesting learning techniques that you can apply to design great learning.

Posted on November 29, 2018.

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(1) The Beginner’s Guide to Deliberate Practice

What’s it about?
Well, that is as straightforward as this title: The Beginner’s Guide to Deliberate Practice!

Why read it?

  • Clear explains the concept of deliberate practice very clearly via some very nice examples from the fields of sports, politics, cooking and martial arts.
  • Learn the difference between deliberate practice and habits, the role of feedback and why they matter for learning
  • Dive deeper via the 12 links to additional resources integrated in this article.

Where to find it?

The Beginner’s Guide to Deliberate Practice

(2) Pruning: Your Brain Has A “Delete” Button–Here’s How To Use It

What’s it about?
In general, the central idea of learning is that the number of connections in our brain increases. But getting rid of (pruning) uneffective connections is also important.

Why watch it?

  • The article starts with a very clear explanation of how brain connections (learning) happens and how we can support that.
  • Via the great ‘garden metaphor’, the concept of ‘synaptic pruning’ will be explained–getting rid of uneffective neural pathways. Watch the video!
  • It all ends with three tips on how to make use of these processes in the best way. I like the first one most: sleep!

Where to find it?

Your Brain Has A “Delete” Button–Here’s How To Use It

(3) What Research Tells Us About Chunking Content

What’s it about?
The way learning designers structure content for learners can be of big influence on learning effectivity. Good chunking pays off.

Why read it?

  • The article shows some very clear and practical insights on how chunking works and the elements that are important.
  • Find great and easy-to-use ‘how-to’ tips for good chunking.
  • Because you, as a true pro, want to read all the great evidence-informed materials that Patti Shank writes!

Where to find it?

What Research Tells Us About Chunking Content

(4) Pigeons Playing Ping Pong

by B.F. Skinner

What’s it about?
You might have heard of the concept of ‘reinforcement’ as a learning strategy, which can be used to learn pigeons play ping pong!

Why read it?

  • It’s a classic learning theory of reinforcement by B.F. Skinner
  • You might have heard of the possibility of learning pigeons how to play ping pong, but have you ever seen it?
  • B.F. Skinner himself explains what is happening in the video.

Where to find it?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vGazyH6fQQ4

Ger’s Learning Notes: #25 Reflection and Self-Awareness

By Ger Driesen

Do you know what the narcissus flower has to do with reflection? In Greek mythology, a guy named Narcissus was known for his beauty. One day, he saw his own reflection in a pool and fell deeply in love with it. When he found out his love would never be reciprocated, he lost his will to live any longer. In the end, his body changed into a narcissus flower. So reflection can not only be a ‘risky business’ but also a strong mechanism for learning as we know from John Dewey. As learning designers, we can support professionals to learn via reflection and to create better self-awareness. But we have to do it the right way and to give you some input for that, reflection and self-awareness are the main topics of this edition of the learning notes. My personal tip: learn from reflection but never look into a pool if you don’t want to end up being a flower. Greetings from Ger (aka Gerbera).

Posted on Oktober 17, 2018.

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(1) Nuts and Bolts: Reflective Practice

What’s it about?
Jane Bozarth explains why reflective practice is so important for learning and gives some concrete suggestions on how to do it.

Why read it?

  • Jane Bozarth is one of the most knowledgeable persons in the L&D community and a master at explaining all kind of topics very clearly – like in this post.
  • The power of reflective practice is clearly explained in the context of professional work.
  • You want tips: you’ll find 10 on how to reflect in this post – good stuff if you want to support others in applying the reflective practice.

Where to find it?

Nuts and Bolts: Reflective Practice

(2) Increase Your Self-Awareness with One Simple Fix

What’s it about?
Tasha Eurich conducted 3 years of research to find that 95% of people think they are self-aware but only 10% to 15% actually are. And she explains how to change this.

Why watch it?

  • Check for yourself if you are amongst the minority of people who are really self-aware or, as Tasha calls them, ‘self-awareness unicorns’.
  • You’ll get a clear insight on how introspection often has a negative influence on self-awareness when we stick with ‘Why?’
  • Learn how ‘What’ questions can help you reach better self-awareness.

Where to find it?

Increase Your Self-Awareness with One Simple Fix

(3) Rolfe’s Framework for Reflective Practice

What’s it about?
It is the most simple and brilliant structure for reflection: What? So what? Now what?

Why read it?

  • It is my all-time favorite structure for reflection: so simple, so easy to apply.
  • It is a one-pager with some clear examples from a nursing context (but very easy to translate to many other situations).

Where to find it?

http://garyrolfe.net/documents/Rolfereflection1.pdf

(4) Millenials and Gen X: The Change Agents That Will Shape the Future Workplace

What’s it about?
These three, young L&D professionals share their thoughts about and experiences with the panel session they did at the recent ATD European Summit.

Why read it?

  • Tap into the views of our new generation L&D colleagues to understand their views and values.
  • Get to know how to work together with this new generation, what they appreciate about ‘older’ generations and how to work together effectively.
  • Use it to reflect: what can you do in your situation to improve teamwork with different generations at work?

Where to find it?

Millennials and Gen X: The Change Agents that Will Shape the Future Workplace

Ger’s Learning Notes: #24 Learning from failure and mistakes

By Ger Driesen

Which mistake that you ever made felt like a catastrophic failure at the time but, upon reflection, was a huge learning opportunity? This edition of the learning notes covers learning from failure and mistakes.

Posted on August 14, 2018.

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(1) Shifting the stigma from learning from mistakes

What’s it about?
Bethany and Jo took a deep dive into exploring the different aspects of learning from mistakes. They covered the negative emotional part, alternative mindsets, language and practical approaches to benefit the most from learning from mistakes.

Why read it?

  • Learn how these interesting, (very) rich companies look at learning and which principles they use.
  • Find concrete examples and links to more background details to understand some of the approaches in detail (so you might apply them yourself).
  • See where learning approaches might be heading in the near future and check if these approaches can be helpful in your situation (be critical!).

Where to find it?

Shifting the stigma from learning from mistakes

(2) The Institute of Brilliant Failures
,

What’s it about?
Professor Paul Iske got interested in the positive side of failure and started to gather all kinds of interesting examples. He then created an institute around it, offering examples, background info and approaches to make the best out of brilliant failures.

Why read it/watch the video?

  • Listen to CFO (Chief Failure Officer!) Paul Iske, who explains the importance of brilliant failures and the mindset needed for that.
  • Learn about the 16 archetypes of failure that help you identify, categorize and learn most from them.
  • Get access to their database of some very interesting cases and find other tools and services the institute has to offer.

Where to find it?

The Institute of Brilliant Failures

(3) Three Fuckup Nights
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What’s it about?
Corporate Rebels created the idea of how to celebrate failure and mistakes via the ‘Fuck-up night’ approach, a TEDx, Pecha Kucha-like event approach. Check three websites that give an overview of a worldwide movement (including a free ebook!).

Why read it?

  • The first link is to the Corporate Rebels’ blog post where they explain the initiative of celebrating failure and Fuckup Nights.
  • The second link is to the Fuckup Nights homepage, and it gives a good overview of the worldwide movement. Don’t forget to download the free ebook!
  • The third website is that of the Failure Institute, presenting many cases and examples.

Where to find it?

(4) Learning from mistakes: the London Fishbowl event write-up

by ‘yours truly’ (@GerDriesen)

What’s it about?
This post is a write-up about the London Fishbowl August 2018 event on shifting the stigma related to learning from mistakes and presents the views of the panellists and audience.

Why read it?

  • Tap into the ‘wisdom of the crowd’ of the 30 L&D professionals that discussed and explored the topic from different angles.
  • Find different clues on how you might support your organisation or become better yourself at learning from mistakes.
  • Read about the Fishbowl approach and learn how you can organise one for collaborative, social learning.

Where to find it?

Learning from mistakes: the London Fishbowl event write-up

Ger’s Learning Notes: #23 Gefundenes Fressen

By Ger Driesen

Two weeks ago, I visited LearnTech Day in Belgium. This wonderful event is an initiative of Mathias Vermeulen. He runs the event based on his own passion for the learning and development profession and his attitude of sharing knowledge and experience. Find below some of the learnings from attending the event.

Posted on July 4, 2018.

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Learning & Development Best Practices from the Top Silicon Valley Companies

(1) Learning & Development Best Practices from the Top Silicon Valley Companies

What’s it about?
This post presents some specific and interesting learning approaches of famous Silicon Valley companies such as Google, Microsoft, Facebook, Amazon and Slack.

Why read it?

  • Learn how these interesting, (very) rich companies look at learning and which principles they use.
  • Find concrete examples and links to more background details to understand some of the approaches in detail (so you might apply them yourself).
  • See where learning approaches might be heading in the near future and check if these approaches can be helpful in your situation (be critical!).

Where to find it?

Learning & Development Best Practices from the Top Silicon Valley Companies

(2) Mel’s Learning Lab by Mel Milloway
,

What’s it about?
Here, you’ll find the portfolio and blog of Mel Milloway. She is a Learning Experience designer at Amazon, and you’ll find her rich portfolio and blog on this page. She presented some of it during the recent LearningTech Day in Belgium.

Why read?

  • I suggest you first explore the portfolio and blog to get an overview of the tons of good and very practical stuff to be found here: amazing!
  • Get inspired by a real ‘experience design mindset’ and see how it might be helpful for you.
  • Find lots of ‘how to’ materials and links to resources that can help you learn new, cool and very useful learning design skills

Where to find it?

Mel’s Learning Lab by Mel Milloway

(3) Designing Learning Experiences in an Evidence-Informed Way

by Mirjam Neelen and Paul Kirshner

What’s it about?
Mirjam explains what the term ‘evidence-informed’ means and what the benefits are for learning design. She includes relevant links to what was presented during LearningTech Day in Belgium, in early June.

Why read/watch it?

  • You want to not only base your professional work on insights that are backed up by evidence via science but also keep it applicable (who doesn’t?).
  • The concept of ‘evidence-based’ is very interesting and useful because it creates a bridge between science and praxis.
  • The post also covers a helpful four-step approach, as presented by Pedro de Bruyckere, to get started with the evidence-informed approach he presented at the LearnTech Day conference.

Where to find it?

Designing Learning Experiences in an Evidence-Informed Way

Start with WHO- the Golden Circle for Learning Design

(4) Start with WHO: the Golden Circle for Learning Design

What’s it about?
Simon Sinek’s ‘Start with WHY’ is a popular and inspiring concept. Would it also be applicable within the learning industry? Yes, it is. But when it comes to learning design, ‘Start with WHO’ might be the more effective way to go.

Why read it?

  • Find out how you can apply the principles of user-centred design for learning design.
  • Make your learning design more performance and context relevant via the ‘jobs to be done’ approach as part of the Who, What, Where, How in the Golden Circle for Learning Design.
  • Do you prefer to digest this topic via video instead of reading? Or both? You can watch the video on this topic, which was recorded at Learning Technologies 2018.

Where to find it?

Start with WHO: the Golden Circle for Learning Design

Ger’s Learning Notes #22 Learner Experience Design (LXD)

By Ger Driesen

Apple has changed the user experience with its products; and that’s how ‘user experience design’ became popular. It also pushed the bars of what consumers expect from products and (online) services: they all expect a ‘great user experience’ today. So, how about learners? They are no different: they also expect, or at least hope, that their learning is a good, or even a great, experience. I hope this edition of the Learning Notes will inspire and help you to create great learner experience design (LXD).

Posted on June 4, 2018.

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(1) Design Thinking: Instructional Design Reimagined

What’s it about?
Brian Melvin explains design thinking and its application to learning design. A clear story of a passionate and experienced learning designer.

Why read it?

  • You immediately discover that this man is a passionate learning professional who wants to move the profession forward.
  • Any better way than to learn from someone who has good experience in application? No!
  • I had the privilege to join Brian at his session at the ATD conference early May. He really loves this theme and keeps on finding and sharing good resources on this topic.

Where to find it?

Design Thinking: Instructional Design Reimagined

(2) Design Thinking for Learning

What’s it about?
From the unsurpassed LearnPatch website! This post presents six resources to explain design thinking for learning.

Why read?

  • Because this post is curated by Martin Couzins. You might not be aware of it, but I’m sure you want to read all posts from the master curator.
  • Listen to the podcast with Sam Burrough (@burrough)—he’s an experienced guy when it comes to learner experience design; he has very interesting things to share.
  • Find different perspectives to get a better understanding of both Design Thinking and Learner Experience Design.

Where to find it?

Design Thinking for Learning

(3) Five User Experience Research Techniques to Borrow for Learning Design

by Mirjam Neelen and Paul Kirshner

What’s it about?
Let’s dive a bit deeper into the tools with Connie Malamed. She shares and explains five research techniques from UX that are useful for LXD.

Why read/watch it?

  • This great post first explains how every technique is used in UX followed by how you can apply it in LXD.
  • For every technique presented, a few links to additional resources are provided.
  • I had the privilege to conduct a one-day workshop on LXD with Conny at a pre-conference workshop at this years’ Learning Solutions conference. She has great experience in this field, so be sure to follow her.

Where to find it?

Five User Experience Research Techniques to Borrow for Learning Design

(4) Personas and Jobs To Be Done: Which Is Better?

by Beatriz Costa

What’s it about?
The use of personas is a popular approach within LXD. Another approach is ‘Jobs To Be Done’. Beatriz compares both to see which one is most useful.

Why read it?

  • ‘Jobs to be done’ is a less popular approach in LXD compared to the use of personas. In my humble opinion, ‘jobs to be done’ might even be more powerful in LXD.
  • It’s good to see both ‘tools’ explained and compared with each other and learn from the clear understanding of the author.
  • ‘Jobs to be done’ brings the performance perspective in a nice way into LXD and complements the traditional Performance Analysis with more empathy.

Where to find it?

Personas and Jobs To Be Done: Which Is Better?

Ger’s Learning Notes: #21

Ger’s Learning Notes #21 ATD Conference 2018

I had the privilege to be a presenter at two sessions at the 2018 ATD and since Obama was a keynote speaker I now consider myself as having been a direct colleague of Obama for a few days :). Read about Obama and my pick of other wonderful sessions at the ATD.

Posted on May 17, 2018.

PS -Did you know that you can sign up to receive the learning notes?

Barack Obama at ATD 2018.

(1) Obama’s Three Leadership Takeaways from The 2018 ATD Conference

by Dan Prontefact @dpontefract

What’s it about?
Dan Pontefract created a good, condensed overview of the three main leadership topics that Obama discussed during his ATD 2018 keynote interview.

Why read it?

  • Of course, you want to know the main topics Obama discussed during the conference.
  • Dan Pontefract covered the theme of leadership in his own books very well, so he is very capable of reviewing and curating what Obama shared.
  • The post covers the atmosphere, the core messages and the most interesting quotes and is concise at the same time – that’s great work.

Where to find it?

Obama’s Three Leadership Takeaways from The 2018 ATD Conference

Marcus Buckingham at ATD 2018

(2) Buckingham to Encourage Attendees To Be Freethinking Leaders

by ATD staff

What’s it about?
Marcus Buckingham, known as the founder of the Strengths Revolution, was the keynote speaker on Tuesday at ATD 2018. The title of his presentation was ‘Love + Work’.

Why read/keep it?

  • It’s so important to be reminded of the Strengths Revolution once in a while and focus more on people’s strengths because our society does not and that is a pity.
  • Marcus suggests that you spend a week in love with your work, meaning that you find those aspects of your job that you love the most. Create a journal of your findings.
  • He shows how the way we organize work is based on lies and that ‘burns us out’. The solution: become a freethinking leader of talent.

Where to find it?

Buckingham to Encourage Attendees To Be Freethinking Leaders

Elaine Biech at adtd 2018

(3) The Art and Science of Training: Solving the Puzzle

By Elaine Biech @ElaineBiech

What’s it about?
Elaine Biech promotes the idea that learning design is both science and art (and wrote a book about it) and suggested how to apply this idea at work during her wonderful session.

Why read/watch it?

  • Elaine Biech is THE ‘Grandmaster’ for the learning profession, writer of many books and engaged in important roles at the ATD for many years
  • First, read the slide deck that you can find at the bottom of the post, and then have a look at the very interesting checklist.
  • Apply, with some colleagues what we did at her ATD session: explore, for each of the scientific facts, how you can implement them in your work situation in an artful way.

Where to find it?

The Art and Science of Training: Solving the Puzzle

Zsolt Olah at ATD 2018.

(4) My Digital Native Millennial Goldfish Story

By by Zsolt Olah @rabbitoreg (and praise for Clark Quinn @Quinnovator)

What’s it about?
Zsolt ‘confesses’ that he’s a ‘Gen X-er’ and not a Millenial and what that means for the way he prefers to learn (fun!)). Inspired by Clark Quinn and the Debunkers Club who gathered at ATD.

Why read it?

  • This post is relevant, funny and has some beautiful GIFs included.
  • The content is based on the new book by Clark Quinn ‘Millenials, Goldfish and other Training Misconceptions’, containing some good Myth-Busting work.
  • Check your assumptions and become a better fact-based learning professional or even join the Debunker Club!

Where to find it?

My Digital Native Millennial Goldfish

Ger’s Learning Notes: #20

Have you ever tried to describe ‘a good vibe’ to someone else? It’s not simple but I’m going to try it anyway. In this edition of the Learning Notes, I’ll do my best to share the good vibes and interesting content of the Learning Solutions Conference 2018.

Posted on April 18, 2018.

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(1) Lessons Learned from Learning Solutions 2018 

by Roberta Dombrowski @Robertamedia

What’s it about?
Roberts shares her experience from different perspectives: as a conference visitor and speaker and as a participant of a pre-conference workshop on Learner Experience Design (we were classmates and worked together in a great team – see results, picture 1).

Why read it?

  • The three perspectives give a nice, broad view of what you can experience at the conference.
  • The post contains slides from Roberta’s presentation, ‘Adopting a Performance Support Mindset’. You should know that Roberta is a Learning Experience Designer who is part of a User Experience Design department – very interesting!
  • Read about Roberta’s ambition to become a speaker at a conference: she succeeded! I hope it will inspire more people to take the initiative to become a speaker. Who’s next?

Where to find it?

Blog by Roberta

(2) The Six Most Inspiring Sessions at the Learning Solutions Conference 2018

by Corjan Bast (and a small contribution from me) @CorjanBast

What’s it about?
My colleague, Corjan Bast, captured the three keynote sessions at the conference and had a private chat with the speakers. As we always say: ‘Learn from the Bast’.

Why read/keep it?

  • Learn insights from the professional violin player Kai Knight and his intense learning journey. Be sure to explore the ‘red pen’ idea.
  • If you are interested in leadership, be sure to read the post about photographer Platon who worked with many world leaders. His special experiences with people who are in power and what he learned from them are fascinating.
  • In the post on futurist Nancy Giordano, you’ll find some concrete clues on how to cope with challenges around the future.Try the ‘RIFF’ model to find your way into the future.

Where to find it?

Blog by Corjan Bast

Heather Snyder and Platon Antoniou

(3) Greetings from Learning Solutions

By Heather Snyder @train_champion

What’s it about?
Heather shares her personal experiences at the conference. She also includes two nice videos in her post.

Why read/watch it?

  • The video’s give a really different kind of impression of being at the conference and the atmosphere there.
  • You’ll get an impression not only off the ‘official’ sessions but also the great ‘fringe’ events like the ‘game crawl’, the ‘DemoFest’, the ‘swag’ and the exhibition!
  • See what it means to be a speaker: I hope it will inspire you to become a speaker and share your ideas and experiences.

Where to find it?

Blog by Heather Snyder

Learning Solutions and Expo logo

(4) The 2018 Learning Solutions Conference Backchannel

By David Kelly @LnDDave

What’s it about?
For many years now, David Kelly has produced ‘Twitter Backchannel’ curated resources from conferences. Now, he does so from his own conferences.

Why read it?

  • See the most relevant resources that were shared via the Twitter Backchannel before, during and after the conference (hashtag #LSCon).
  • Find additional resources related to the three keynote sessions for a deeper dive.
  • While on the website, take a look around and explore the valuable resources that David Kelly did put together from many other conferences.

Where to find it?

Blog by David Kelly

Ger’s Learning Notes: #19 Content Curation

Gers learning notes #19 Content Curation

Curate instead of create. In this episode, we’re talking about content curation for learning and performance support. Do you want a concrete example to clarify content curation? You are very close: how about reading the new learning notes – my irregular content curation attempt regarding all things learning?

Posted on March 1, 2018.

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(1) Are You a Curator or a Dumper?

by Jennifer Gonzalez @cultofpedagogy

What’s it about?
Jennifer shows us how enthusiasm and good intentions can become a common pitfall of being a ‘Dumper’ instead of a ‘Curator’. She’ll take you by the hand to learn about good curation. You can choose: read the text or listen to the podcast.

Why read/listen to it?

  • Jennifer gives a very clear explanation about the difference between dumping and curating and why it matters.
  • The article provides six practical guidelines for good content curation followed by six curation tools.
  • If you like Sushi and want to learn more about Sushi – there’s great curated Sushi content inside!

Where to find it?

Are You a Curator or a Dumper?

(2) Content Curation Tools (Overview)

by Robin Good @RobinGood

What’s it about?
This is the ‘ZEEF’ page of the ‘master content curator’ Robin Good, showing a categorized overview of content curation tools. This is ‘practice what you preach’, applying ZEEF as one of the tools.

Why read/keep it?

  • This overview shows 500+ links to curation tools in 56 categories – it really is the big curation tools bonanza!
  • If you want to apply curation, you should know of Robin Good as a thought leader in curation. One of the overviews shows you 39 other thought leaders (including David Kelly – see note 4 below).
  • The list will be updated, growing over time. It is a great content curation example in itself!

Where to find it?

Content Curation Tools (Overview)

(3) Facebook Friday – Stephen Walsh on Content Curation for Learning.

Interview by Fiona Quigley @FionaQuigs

What’s it about?
Fiona Quigly interviews Stephen Walsh to clarify the essentials of content curation. See it as a ‘primer’ for the e-book Stephen wrote on this topic (link to free e-book included)

Why wach it?

  • Stephen explains content curation from the perspective of a (any) professional referring to Harold Jarche’s Seek-Sense-Share.
  • The second part is about applying content curation combined with other learning interventions to create ongoing learning journeys. It’s extremely informative, with ‘leadership development’ as an example.
  • Learn from his smart advice like: Set your filters, make it a habit, do it together.
    And here is the link to the e-book: https://blog.anderspink.com/2017/04/content-curation-book/

Where to find it?

Facebook Friday – Stephen Walsh on Content Curation for Learning.

(4) How to Curate: Putting Curation into Practice for L&D

By David Kelly @LnDDave

What’s it about?
The title says it all: Putting Curation into Practice. That is one part – and we all like practical tips, don’t we? But it also specifically has a focus on L&D, so its highly relevant – a second reason to read this post.

Why read it?

  • This also is a very ‘practice what you preach’ content curation post. It starts with the slide deck that David Kelly uses when talking about the topic at conferences.
  • After the slide deck, you’ll find additional resources (weblinks) structured into categories (hey – sounds like content curation!)
  • The list covers the posts of many of my favorite content curation professionals. At the end – if we were allowed to only choose one content curator to follow, for me, it would be David Kelly.

Where to find it?

How to Curate: Putting Curation into Practice for L&D

Ger’s Learning Notes: #18 Performance Support

Ger’s Learning Notes- #18 Performance Support

Without realising it, you use a lot of performance support every day. This support comes in various shapes and sizes. You will find more details on this in this edition of learning notes.

Posted on January 24, 2018.

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(1) The importance and value of the checklist by Atul Gawande (TED talk)

by Atul Gawande @Atul_Gawande

What’s it about?
Atul Gawande explains the power of the checklist – how it can improve performance (and save lives!). Improving performance using checklists can be much more effective than learning/training; it can also be an important ‘add-on’ for highly skilled professionals.
.

Why watch it?

  • You’ll be surprised by the magnificent results Gawande and his colleagues managed to achieve by applying checklists in healthcare (He is a surgeon.).
    Gawande also provides inspiring examples of the successful application of checklists in other professional areas.
  • Watch it as a ‘primer’, and then read his book, ‘The Checklist Manifesto’.
  • aNewSpring provides a specific functionality to create checklists! See the info at the bottom of this page. Combine it with the new QR code functionality, and Atul Gawande will be proud of you!

Where to find it?
The importance and value of the checklist

(2) The anatomy of the modern learning professional

by Nick Shackleton-Jones @shackletonjones

What’s it about?
Nick Shackleton-Jones has been sharing his thoughts on ‘moving from courses to resources’ for many years now. In this overview, he presents a practical overview of examples of resources that can be used. I like that he added ‘experiences’ to his latest thinking.
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Why read it?

  • Broaden your scope to prevent yourself from ‘walking into the learning trap’ too easily.
  • See how you can add additional – likely even more – value as a learning designer when you create performance support and experiences.
  • See 24 examples of performance support ideas in the infographic (and yes – the use of an infographic is one of them!), and get 30 examples of experience design for free!

 

Where to find it?

The anatomy of the modern learning professional

The 70:20:10 performance support storm

(3) The 70:20:10 performance support storm

by Jos Arets (@AretsJos), Charles Jennings (@charlesjennings) and Vivian Heijnen (@VivianHeijnen)

What’s it about?
The Performance Support Storm is a part (chapter 3) of a larger document called ‘70:20:10 into action’. It puts performance support in a wider (70:20:10 framework) perspective.

Why read?

  • The article gives some some essential background on the basics of performance support.
  • I very much like the checklist that is included. It helps you to explore (I should say ‘check’) and identify when performance support is an opportunity.
  • The checklist and the whole chapter gives references to the ‘grandmasters’ of performance support (Gery, Mosher, Gottfredson, Rosenberg and Rosset), so be sure to have a look at all the references at the end of the article.

Where to find it?

The 70:20:10 performance support storm

Performance support - laundry

(4) My 3 favorite low-tech performance support examples

By me @GerDriesen

What’s it about?
There are many brilliant performance support solutions that are ‘low tech’ but very effective. See four pictures and get inspired about your low-tech performance support solution.

Why read it?

  • Picture 1: shows a low-tech, wearable, performance support example. I’m sure you even wear one yourself right now. And more magic – it is always available at ‘the moment of need’.
  • Picture 2: a really nice vintage performance support example. My friend, Michelle Ockers, recently reintroduced this one at Quantas after I shared it with her.
  • Picture 3: embedded low-tech performance support. Right where you need it – integrated with your workplace tabletop where you have to perform your task. In this case, leading to ‘yummy’ results.

Where to find it?

Ger’s LinkedIn Pulse

Ger’s Learning Notes: #17 Microlearning

Microlearning, a very relevant topic which hasn’t appeared in my learning notes yet. Why not? Well,  I waited a bit to be able to do a live interview with ‘the queen of microlearning’ a.k.a. Shannon Tipton. We had planned to do an interview in late 2017 for including it as a unique resource in this episode of my learning notes.

Posted on January 8, 2018.

PS -Did you know that you can sign up to receive the bi-weekly learning notes?

(1) Interview with ‘the Queen of Microlearning’ Shannon Tipton

by Shannon Tipton @stipton

What’s it about?
Shannon ‘Learning Rebel’ Tipton explains the most important features of microlearning in a very smart and practical way.

Why watch it?

  • Shannon has a practical and well-considered view on what microlearning should be and is not.
  • She delivered both a one-day pre-conference workshop and a ‘full-house’ concurrent session on microlearning at the ATD International Conference in Atlanta last May. She really knows what she is talking about!
  • Learn about the crucial basics, so you won’t be fooled and can be the trusted adviser regarding all things microlearning. Also read the great blogpost at the Learning Rebels website.

Where to find it?
Interview with ‘the Queen of Microlearning’ Shannon Tipton

(2) Six common microlearning myths
,

by Clive Shepherd @cliveshepherd

What’s it about?
Clive Shepherd says, I believe there is ample evidence to show how, when it is designed and implemented well, microlearning can achieve great results. But it is not a panacea and works best as a strategic element in the overall architecture of workplace learning. When this learning veteran says this, you want to know more!

Why read it?

  • We all like mythbusting, don’t we? Be aware of the most common myths, so you know how to avoid them.
  • The word ‘common’ is very important in the title of this post. Clive Shepherd picks six topics that seem logically connected to microlearning, but be aware of your assumptions. Keep your thinking clear, just the way Clive does
  • At the end, it is not about myth busting; this post gives some well-balanced thought to when, where and how to make use of microlearning and when, where and how not to.

Where to find it?

Six common microlearning myths by Clive Shepherd

(3) Microlearning techniques: What you need to know about microlearning

by Tracy Scott

What’s it about?
This post is a combination of explaining the characteristics of microlearning as well as the steps needed to create a microlearning strategy.

Why read?

  • The first part explains the three critical components related to microlearning (which is very relevant, in my opinion).
  • You can check if microlearning is right for you and, if so, learn about the four steps you can take to develop a microlearning strategy.
  • And finally, if you like pizza, do check out the included pizza example!

Where to find it?

Microlearning techniques: What you need to know about microlearning

(4) The 47 best microlearning infographics
,

On Pinterest

What’s it about?
Infographics can be great examples of a microlearning modality. Here are 47 infographics related to microlearning (or learning, in general).

Why read it?

  • The infographics present some useful content related to microlearning and learning in general.
  • You’ll find some nice ideas of how to use infographics as examples of microlearning.
  • I count on you to (make and) share your best or favorite infographic

Where to find it?

The 47 best microlearning infographics

Ger’s Learning Notes: #16 Learning culture

‘Culture eats strategy for breakfast, lunch and dinner’ is a famous saying you’ve probably heard before. I think the same goes for a ‘learning’ culture. If a learning culture is good, it will support the effectiveness of all well-designed learning opportunities and interventions. If the learning culture is weak, the effectiveness of learning and application on the job might be very poor, despite a great design.
So, let’s explore some resources on learning culture.

Posted on November 21, 2017.

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(1) From a training culture to a learning culture

by Stephen J. Gill

What’s it about?
This post by Stephen Gill explores the differences between a training culture and a learning culture. Great professionals who are very good at designing training can actually be a risk for a good learning culture.

Why read it?

  • The tough part of culture is that it is implicit; it’s so obvious that nobody is talking about it. The distinction between training culture and learning culture can open up the discussion and create a ‘fresh look’.
  • The article provides some clear directions on how to evolve from a training culture towards a learning culture.
  • Stephen Gill places training and learning in the context of the modern workplace – a good exercise for all of us.

Where to find it?
From a Training Culture to a Learning Culture

(2) Learning technologies: what managers really think

What’s it about?
The team of GoodPractice has an impressive track record in conducting field research on leadership and learning. What do managers appreciate when it comes to learning? GoodPractice asked the question and shares the answers.

Why read it?

  • Learning professionals do have ambitions and starting points and are influenced by what is ‘hot’ in their industry. That is a good thing in itself, but do we know what works best for the audience we focus on? This report shows the preferences of how managers like to learn best.
  • The data show some surprising results and very relevant nuances and reflections based on the time frame we are in right now.
  • The results were launched on November 16, 2017, so it’s really, really fresh content!

Where to find it?

Learning Technologies: What Managers Really Think

(3) Personal reflections from LearnTech Asia
.

by Helen Blunden @ActivateLearn

What’s it about?
Helen Blunden shares her findings from her visit to the Learning Technologies Asia conference in Singapore early November. She wanted to learn about Asian culture related to learning. She also conducted one of the sessions at the conference.

Why read / watch it?

  • Helen came to the conference with an open mind and really wanted to reflect on her own cultural roots by being submerged in another culture.
  • Have a look at what you can discover if you apply a positive mindset, like Helen did: there must be a lot of good and interesting things to learn from this other culture (like the value of diplomas).
  • Video clips with personal reflection are included plus, as a bonus, free tourist/travel tips!

Where to find it?
Personal Reflections from LearnTech Asia

(4) Ten practical insights to improve your learning culture

What’s it about?
It is a ‘big post’ by BigThink. This organisation shares very interesting insights of the world’s most-renowned thought leaders in many areas.

Why read it?

  • It is a bit of a self-promotion post by BigThink, but I think they deserve it: they have shared so much ‘good stuff’ for many years now – one of my favorite ‘go-to guys’ for interesting content.
  • They created the BigThink Edge platform to support learning in organisations, so they have their own experiences on how to add to learning culture and share these experiences.
  • The list of ten insights is built around the insights of ‘big names’, an impressive list of thought leaders and their ideas on learning culture.

Where to find it?
10 Practical Insights to Improve Your Learning Culture

Ger’s Learning Notes #15 The World of Learning

What is the best name for a conference on learning? World of Learning certainly comes close. The 25th edition of the ‘WOL’ event, which I’ve covered in this edition of the learning notes, took place in Birmingham on 17 and 18 October. Cheers – Ger

Posted on October 27, 2017.

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(1) Interview with Geoff Stead from Cambridge [Video]

What’s it about?
Geoff worked in a L&D related job for a hardware company in Silicon Valley where he was challenged to experiment in a situation that he likes to call ‘abundant’. What can we learn from such a specific environment?

Why watch it?

  • Geoff has an impressive track record and was engaged in different interesting roles in the L&D industry – he shares some of these experiences in the video.
  • Have you ever asked yourself what it would be like to work in circumstances that can be characterised as ‘abundant’? Resources and possibilities are limitless – how would that be?
  • Geoff gives clues on how to approach L&D work with a broad perspective – do you all call this L&D work? Who cares!

Where to find it?
aNewSpring Vimeo – Interview with Geoff Stead from Cambridge

(2) Interview with David Smith from Virtual Gurus [Video]

by @dsvirtually (David Smith)

What’s it about?
David has an impressive agenda ahead of him as a speaker at different international upcoming conferences. David gives us a sneak peek of what he will share in Kuala Lumpur, Mexico and Amsterdam – all before the end of the year. He’s also chairing the ATD EU summit in Amsterdam in December 2017.

Why watch it?

  • David shares some ideas as a specialist when it comes to an effective way of working in the virtual world.
  • He talks about the importance of engaging the modern learner and how to do that.
  • Find out why he really likes ‘starting with Why?’

Where to find it?
aNewSpring Vimeo – Interview with David Smith from Virtual Gurus

(3) Interview with Robin Hoyle – chair of the WOL conference [PODCAST]

by @RHoyle

What’s it about?
Robin did a great job in preparing the conference and hosting the participants as the official chair. He is the man with the best overview of the most interesting topics covered at the conference.

Why listen to it?

  • Discover ‘the connection of the dots’ related to the conference as expressed by Robin Hoyle from his perspective as chair.
  • Find out the importance of ‘AND’, Google and Festivals related to learning.
  • Listen to the invitation by Robin to join WOL18

Where to find it?
Interview with Robin Hoyle – chair of the WOL conference [Podcast]

aNewSpring at world of learning2

(4) My 7 takeaways from World of Learning by Ger Driesen [Blog]

What’s it about?
I did some cherry picking from the sessions that I attended at the conference. The seven takeaways don’t intent to be a full report of the sessions. They are the key messages that inspired me most.

Why read it?

  • If you don’t like the video’s or have time to watch them – here is a quick overview that you can enjoy without needing headphones.
  • The various takeaways give you an impression of the program at WOL.
  • I think all seven messages contain a core idea that can be applied instantly.

Where to find it?
My 7 takeaways from World of Learning – aNewSpring

Ger’s Learning Notes #14 – Transfer Included?

At airports, you can find many signs and services to support you with your transfer. In this edition of the learning notes, you’ll find some ‘signs and services’ to help you with learning transfer. Now, sit back, relax and enjoy the ride. Cheers – Ger

Posted on October 4, 2017.

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Six brain hacks for better learning transfer

(1) Six brain hacks for better learning transfer

What’s it about?
Emma Weber is ‘the Queen of learning transfer’ – a real thought leader when it comes to this topic. She interviewed neuroscience expert Colleen Lightbody on brain insights related to learning transfer.

Why read it?

  • There are different angles to approach the challenge of learning transfer. Learning transfer has to be designed and organised. It’s very relevant to know the most important insights for learning transfer, from neuroscience to design learning, in the most effective way.
  • You’ll find the explanation at brain level—how a certain ‘brain hack’ works combined with the practical ‘how to’. A very nice combination.
  • If you want more detailed information, you can also listen to the podcast of the interview; the link to the podcast is provided.

Where to find it?
Six brain hacks for better learning transfer by Emma Weber

The benefits of a good night’s sleep – TED Ed video

(2) The benefits of a good night’s sleep – TED Ed video

by Shai Marcu

What’s it about?
Improving the transfer of learning is not only about putting in more effort or doing an extra activity. Effective learning also needs rest. The video explains why.

Why read it?

  • Many people seem to be busier than ever before. In some organisations or teams, it seems ‘cool’ to say you can survive with only 5 hours of sleep per night or think that sleep is a waste of time. But, if you want your brain to work in an optimal way, then sleep is very important.
  • The video explains processes in the brain and the function of sleep – also related to learning and different forms of learning.
  • Think about how, where and when you will include a portion of ‘sleep’ into your learning design and then – sleep on it!

Where to find it?
The benefits of a good night’s sleep –

(3) Why is learning transfer so hard?

What’s it about?
Connie Malamed explains the phenomena of transfer of learning, shows the most important barriers and describes how to overcome these barriers.

Why read it?

  • First, the idea of ‘far transfer’ and ‘near transfer’ are explained. It is important to understand transfer in different situations.
  • The approach in this article is a smart combination of looking at barriers to transfer first and to do so with the ‘classical approach’ of the before-during-after view of learning.
  • Like always, Connie Malamed will give you some useful tips and the finest additional resources when you want to dig deeper.

Where to find it?
Why is learning transfer so hard?

Eight tips to improve knowledge transfer in eLearning

(4) Eight tips to improve knowledge transfer in eLearning

What’s it about?
These eight tips cover transfers in a broad way and from different perspectives. This helps to design for transfer ‘beyond the e-learning course’.

Why read it?

  • Christopher Pappas is the founder of the huge eLearning Industry Network – who else has a better overview of relevant tips?
  • I like that he combines tips from different areas, starting with analysis, applying the design of transfer within e-learning and designing the context of the learner.
  • If you apply these tips, you’ll turn your e-learning ‘automatically’ into a blended learning solution.

Where to find it?
Eight tips to improve knowledge transfer in eLearning

Ger’s Learning Notes #13 – Blend It Like Beckham

The major highlight of this summer in The Netherlands was the UEFA Women’s Euro Football Tournament. The Dutch team won the championship, creating real hype around women’s football. It reminded me of the pleasant movie ‘Bend It Like Beckham. The movie is about a daughter who rebels against her parents’ traditionalism and joins a football team.

It’s a small step to this edition of the learning notes, which contains many tips to design Blended Learning, and so, the title ‘Blend It Like Beckham’ emerged. I hope these practical tips will inspire you and really help you to create effective blended learning. Cheers – Ger

Posted on September 1, 2017.

PS -Did you know that you can sign up to receive the bi-weekly learning notes?

5-ways-to-make-virtual-training

(1) Five ways to make virtual training as effective as face-to-face training

What’s it about?
This e-book explores how to get virtual training as effective as (good) face-to-face training with a focus on five concrete steps.

Why read it?

  • Learning will continue to be delivered ‘online’, so be transferred to the virtual world. Many people think this can’t be as effective as face-to-face training.
  • It’s not a technology issue—it’s a design issue; and with proper design, virtual classes can be as good as face-to-face training (or even better).
  • This e-book give five concrete steps to follow for effective virtual classes.
  • My personal experience: It’s very refreshing to design virtual learning. You’ll be challenged to be very careful and explicit in the design choices you’ll make.

Where to find it?
Five ways to make virtual training as effective as face-to-face training [E-book]

How-to-use-infographic-for-your-training-program

(2) How to use infographics, videos, web stories and more to support your training program 

What’s it about?
Dan Jones gives a great overview of different apps that are very useful and valuable for learning and development (L&D) professionals.

Why read it?

  • First of all: This post is a great recap of the ‘full house’ and highly valued session that Dan Jones delivered at the ATD conference in Atlanta in May 2017.
  • It describes many practical apps in brief and categorises them related to their specific functionality.
  • Don’t we all like to include ‘awesome apps’ in our learning design to surprise and engage the learners we want to serve?

Where to find it?
How to use infographics, videos, web stories and more to support your training program

10-Tips-for-Designing-Effective-Social-Learning

(3) Ten tips for designing effective social learning 

What’s it about?
‘The Master’ of social learning, Julian Stodd, shares his best insights and experience around social learning.

Why read it?

  • Social learning can be a very effective building block in a blended learning approach for the modern learner – so it’s one to consider to be part of the blend.
  • This post shows the combination of elements and their interconnection to design and facilitates social learning that works.
  • My favorites: The elements of scaffolding and facilitation. They make the difference between a ‘nice experiment’ and a successful learning solution.

Where to find it?
Ten tips for designing effective social learning

Science-of-Learning-101--When-to-Build-Performance-Support,-Part-1

(4) Science of Learning 101: When to build performance support, part 1

What’s it about?
This post clarifies some important distinctions between performance support and training, and defines when to use what.

Why read it?

  • This post starts with the right clarifying questions to include the objective and the context before deciding to go for training or performance support (or both!).
  • In my opinion, there is a world to win for L&D professionals when they take performance support more often into consideration as part of their blended learning solution.
  • First, understand the distinctions between training and performance support, and then, integrate them in a smart way in your blended learning design for the best results.

Where to find it?
Science of Learning 101: When to build performance support, part 1

Ger’s Learning Notes #12 – Eclectic blended learning tips

What do you feel when you read the word ‘eclectic’? I first learned the word in relation to architecture. If a building can’t be categorised in a specific architectural style because it is a mixture – just call the style eclectic. (Merriam-Webster’s definition: composed of elements drawn from various sources). I simply love the word and it fit’s the theme of this edition of the learning notes. Besides the fact that all four notes are dedicated to inspire learning, they are eclectic. Cheers – Ger

Posted on August 1, 2017.

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Using cat gifs for learning

(1) Eleven instructional design truths according to cat gifs – By Edmond Manning

What’s it about?
Edmond provides eleven very relevant tips to keep in mind when designing learning. For each tip he added a Cat.gif covering the core message – hilarious and brilliant!

Why read it?

  • The 11 tips are really concrete and useful, very relevant to apply when designing learning. The tips are basic and fundamental – good to keep in mind all the time (and after you saw these – you’ll do so!).
  • The cat.gifs are hilarious, very creative and fun – helps you to remember.
  • Edmond Manning is a very experienced learning professional – take a look at his other posts for more valuable stuff.

Where to find it?
11 Instructional Design Truths According to Cat .gifs

(2) How can L&D start delivering online learning? – Podcast by @RossGarnerGP, @Stefania_Scott & @GerDriesen

What’s it about?
There is a lot of talking about online learning suggesting everybody ‘is doing it’. Of course that is not the case and everybody has to start sometime, somehow. That is what the podcast covers.

Why listen to it?

  • If you are on the threshold of getting started with online learning – a lot of topics to think of and tips how to handle them are discussed
  • The approach has respect and empathy for all those very good learning professionals that did not get started with online learning yet – it’s about gradually moving to a different approach blending in online learning.
  • Benefit from the different professional background and experiences from Ross, Stef and myself.

Where to find it?
Podcast 55 — How can L&D start delivering online learning?

10-Visual-Design-Tips-for-elearning-and-slides

(3) 10 Visual Design Tips For eLearning And Slides – by Connie Malamed

What’s it about?
If your goal is to get better at visual design, you don’t need to be a talented artist. You just need to learn and apply the basic principles of visual design as presented in this post. and practice, practice, practice. In this SlideShare presentation below, Connie gathered up ten important principles and little tips from her book, Visual Design Solutions.

Why read it?

  • ‘Visual’ becomes more important because we have so many possibilities these days to create stunning visuals. People in general – also learners – will have a higher expectation regarding visuals.
  • Visuals can make or break learning materials and thus the visual aspect is very important from a psychological and learning effectiveness point of view.
  • The ten tips are based on the great book by Connie Malamed – who is a thought leader offering lots of good resources.

Where to find it?
10 visual design tips – by Connie Malamed

What's your training strategy?

(4) What’s Your Training Strategy? By Rashim Mogha (@rmogha)

What’s it about?
It’s not so much about strategic training but more about the strategies you might use to position and deliver training as products or services – you might even call them tactics in my point of view.

Why read it?

  • The title uses a question to start with and throughout the blog 15 more questions will be posed. And you know – questions make you think!
  • The topics and questions cover different angles of learning approaches. The one might look more relevant than the other – but please take time to explore the one that seems less relevant at first.
  • Taking time to think about and clarify your training strategy is a good time investment. It will provide you direction in your day to day activities.

Where to find it?
What’s Your Training Strategy?

Ger’s Learning Notes #11 – Let the music play!

Music plays an important role to get work done at the aNewSpring office and I can image you sometimes put your headphones on when you need to get work done. Let’s discover the link between music and learning. Cheers – Ger

Posted on June 30, 2017.

PS -Did you know that you can sign up to receive the bi-weekly learning notes?

Learning and music notes

(1) Five powerful ways music can improve your memory – By Takelessons

What’s it about?
This popular blog post explores the relationship between music and memory. It provides five reasons to listen to memory boosting music. It also contains a list of relevant songs (videos included).

Why read it?

  • This post is a nice and easy introduction to music and learning.
  • There are links included to other (original) resources – it’s good to check them out, too.
  • It has a list of songs embedded (video’s) with explanations of the situations where to use what.
  • My advice: combine this popular note with the second note for a more scientific background.

Where to find it?
Five powerful ways music can improve your memory – by Takelessons blog

learning music in classroom

(2) Music and learning: integrating music in the classroom – by Chris Boyd Brewer

What’s it about?
This is a more fundamental resource. The article is reprinted from the book Music and Learning by Chris Brewer, 1995. It includes methods of integrating music in the curriculum and suggestions on what music to use are included.

Why read it?

  • I believe it is an intriguing idea to include music into learning design to create more effective and more inspiring  learning journeys.
  • To do a sound check (pun intended) related to the theory of what is effective for different situations so you can make well informed and effective learning design choices.
  • It is a very well structured overview – maybe not so attractive to read but keep it in your toolkit and review the relevant parts when applicable.

Where to find it?
Music and learning: integrating music in the classroom – by Chris Boyd Brewer

concert music learning from song

(3) Right to be wrong – song by Joss Stone

What’s it about?
I love the song, and above all, I love the lyrics. The title says it all – the right to be wrong: it reminds us of degrees of freedom to be able to learn.

Why listen to it?

  • First of all: because it is a beautiful song!
  • The lyrics contain some important messages for learning professionals. No matter if you are a learning designer or you facilitate learning as a trainer or moderator: it is all about the learner and you need to give the learner ‘space’ to find and follow her/his own learning path.
  • That might help learning professionals to prevent for ‘over structuring’.
  • I used this song often when learning to play drums – it has some very nice riffs!

Where to find it?
Right to be wrong – song by Joss Stone

Qlipo learning note

(4) Qlipo: Learn to speak Spanish (3 songs)

What’s it about?
There are quite some resources available on the internet to learn a language via songs. This one is on Spanish with three video clips of Spanish songs.

Why watch it?

  • Because it’s fun and you want to learn some Spanish!
  • I hope it will inspire you: experience how simple it can be to use music to learn something new.
  • Use it to think about how you could include music into your learning design (and let me know how you did it!).

Where to find it?
Qlipo: Learn to speak Spanish (3 songs)

Ger’s Learning Notes #10 – Impact

The theme of our annual customer day (check out these photo’s) this year  was ‘Impact’. A great theme for the 10th edition the learning notes. What else is more satisfying than a customer or colleague thanking you for a positive impact you made through your work? These notes will help you get there. Cheers – Ger

Posted on June 16, 2017.

PS -Did you know that you can sign up to receive the bi-weekly learning notes?

Four ways you can increase learning efficiency

(1) Four ways you can increase learning efficiency today – by Laura Overton

What’s it about?
Key stakeholders want learning to be efficient. As technology has matured so have the expectations of different stakeholders. So, how can we create more impact and efficiency?

Why read it?

  • The findings are based on the infamous The Towards Maturity Benchmark.
  • The learnings are evidence bases (based on results from top performers).
  • The article presents four tips for increasing efficiency.
  • Start with this article and discover the rich ‘bonanza’ that Towards Maturity has to offer

Where to find it?
Four ways you can increase learning efficiency today – by Laura Overton

(2) Five moments of learning Need (video) – by GoodPractice

What’s it about?
Being aware of the ‘five moments of need’ is a fundamental way to understand how to design (blended) learning solutions for maximum impact.

Why read it?

  • It’s an excellent video (of 3.17 minutes) that explains the ‘five moments of need’. It’s simply and easy to digest.
  • It will help you as learning designer to create learning solutions that have a maximum ‘fit for use’.
  • Designing with the five moments of need in mind will save you time (and money) and increase the impact of your work.

Where to find it?
Five moments of learning Need (video) – by GoodPractice

(3) Exploring the cause of poor performance (recorded AITD webinar) – by Ger Driesen

What’s it about?
Impact can only be reached if we focus our efforts and tailor our interventions related to a clear analysis of the problem we face and more important: the causes behind it. This webinar covers a systematic approach (checklist) for finding causes for poor performance.

Why read it?

  • It will teach you a systematic, analytical approach to find causes of poor performance via a step-by-step checklist.
  • Knowing real causes will help you to design effective interventions and avoid pushing learning when it’s not effective.
  • The approach will help you prepare and lead conversations with your stakeholders. 
  • Tip: Main content starts at 3 minutes.   

Where to find it?
Exploring the cause of poor performance (recorded AITD webinar) – by Ger Driesen

(4) How trainers should show up for work (video) – By Jim Smith Jr.

What’s it about?
In this short video mister Jim Smith Jr. – also known as ‘Mr. Jimpact’ or ‘Mr. Energy’ – shares his vision on the role of the modern learning professional. Recorded at the ATD2017 conference.

Why watch it?

  • Have a bad day? Watch this video and you’ll feel better!
  • Jim gives a focussed overview of the world of learning today, 
  • ..and his vision on what this means for learning professionals.
  • You’ve got to bring it, got to bring it, got to bring it!

Where to find it?
Mr. Energy – video

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Ger’s Learning Notes #9 – What happened at ATD 2017

You were looking forward to visiting ATD this year but you couldn’t make it? This edition of my learning notes is created based on sessions at ATD 2017 in Atlanta. – Cheers – Ger

Posted on May 31, 2017.

PS -Did you know that you can sign up to receive the bi-weekly learning notes?

(1) Micro Learning in micro time: Creating just-in-time learning by Shannon Tipton

What’s it about?
At the start of the conference ATD President and CEO Tony Bingham focussed on the importance of micro learning during his opening speech. Micro learning instantly became the hot topic of the conference. Shannon Tipton gave a very good, well structured and thought through overview of micro learning during her session.

Why read it?

  • Get a clear and clever overview and understanding of what micro learning is and isn’t.
  • Learn that ‘micro’ in fact should be ‘right sized’ depending on the actual situation.
  • Discover the 6 markers and the ‘Discover-Develop-Deliver approach for micro learning.

Where to find it?
Shannon Tipton on micro learning

(2) Activators – How to make learning stick by Sebastian Bailey

What’s it about?
There were many sessions related to brain, brain science and the application of brain science in different areas. Sebastian Bailey holds a PhD in Psychology and Education and introduced ‘the Activator’. The Activator is a person who knows what to do when he knows not what to do. He presented the characteristics of an Activator and how learning works best for them.

Why read it?

  • Learn more about the concept of Activators and their characteristics.
  • He debunks some myths about effective learning by stating that almost everything works.
  • He gives concrete and interesting clues – backed up by science – how to make learning stick.
  • The presentation contains relevant principles that you can apply for effective learning design.

Where to find it?
Sebastian Bailey’s presentation

(3) How it’s made: Create a learning and performance ecosystem by Ger Driesen

What’s it about?
To handle fundamental strategic learning and development needs, quick fixes won’t do the job. A well-designed learning and performance support ecosystem is needed to yield relevant and sustainable results. What exactly is a learning and performance ecosystem and how can you create one?

Why read it?

  • The principles and building blocks of learning and performance ecosystems are explained.
  • Learn about the importance of interconnections of different interventions for additional value and sustainability.
  • Find clues on how to create and successfully implement a learning and performance ecosystem that fits your context.

Where to find it?
Ger Driesen’s presentation on learning ecosystems

Be patient, it might take a while to load because of the file size

(4) The 2017 ATD ICE Backchannel: Curated resources #ATD2017 by David Kelly

What’s it about?
David Kelly is a master ‘curator’ who creates a great overview of backchannel resources of major conferences. He does so for many years now (great work!). In this overview you’ll find the most relevant resources of the ATD 2017 conference.

Why read it?

  • You’ll find a well structured overview of the most relevant resources related to the conference.
  • Find general info, session specific info and additional resources that relate to the conference themes.
  • Be sure that you know of the good work of David Kelly – explore his website for curated resources of many other events.

Where to find it?
David Kelly’s curated resources for ATD 2017

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Ger’s Learning Notes #8 – Inspiration from Japan

The last few weeks a lot of things related to Japan popped up in different places. What is Ikigai? What does ‘get to your Gemba’ mean. How can you use PechaKucha? And what does it have to do with learning? Find out in this edition of the ‘Japanese’ learning notes. – Ganbatte! Ger-San

Posted on May 5, 2017.

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Ikigai learning note

(1) Ikigai: the reason you get up in the morning – by Aly Juma

What’s it about?
Ikigai is the Japanese word for ‘reason for being’ or as mentioned in the title of this blog ‘the reason you get up in the morning’. It’s about finding the best combination of what you love, what you’re good at, what the world needs and what you can be paid for.

Why read it?

  • After reviewing many posts and video’s – this one gives a clear and brief explanation of Ikigai, including the Ikigai venn diagram and some beautiful pictures.
  • Ikigai seems to be(come) a popular concept and is very much related to the profession of learning and development – so you should know about it!
  • It’s a very positive concept: it even seems to be the ‘secret sauce’ of the people living in Okinawa who live very long.

Where to find it?
http://alyjuma.com/ikigai/

Deborah Adler Tedtalk

(2) Go to the Gemba –  by Deborah Adler

What’s it about?
Go to the Gemba means: go to the real place, go to where the work gets done. A good advice for many professionals.

Why watch it?

  • Go to the Gemba is the most important thing that I learned when I worked for a Japanese company. It’s absolutely valuable and important for learning and development professionals to understand the work, work processes and context of the people we want to support with learning.
  • I love the perspective of the designer Deborah Adler: her examples, challenges and solutions are so clear and inspiring to explain the ‘go to the Gemba’ concept.

Where to find it?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_DGAGzyPEg

Pechakucha learning note

(3) PechaKucha – by PechaKucha.org

What’s it about?
PechaKucha, also known as 20×20, is a modern format and style to deliver a presentation. You have to tell your story via 20 slides, only pictures, no text and each slide will only be up on screen for 20 seconds (autocue).

Why read it?

  • PechaKucha has become quite mainstream today but often the starting points are applied only in a very loose way and that is a pity (or a shame!).
  • Dive into the original source of PechaKucha so you know how it is meant to be applied – don’t forget that the presentations are ‘conversation starters’. So if you organise or deliver a PechaKucha be sure conversation is included.
  • Find your local PechaKucha night and plan your visit – you’ll love it!  And there is even a PechaKucha of the day app available.

Where to find it?
http://www.pechakucha.org/

Learning nugget 4 Toyota

(4) Nemawashi by The Original Blog of Toyota GB

What’s it about?
Nemawashi refers to creating commitment, bringing together and exploring the points of view of different stakeholders before taking a decision (I had to learn it the hard way).

Why read it?

  • What I love, and what I believe is very valuable, is the wise story behind the Japanese way of working. In any profession, in any culture, the art of creating consensus – not for the sake of consensus but for the sake of effective decision making – seems very valuable to me.
  • Read this and all the other 11 pillars of the Toyota Production System in this fantastic blog – it is a very useful toolset (including mindset!) and try to apply all you can in your work processes.

Where to find it?
http://blog.toyota.co.uk/nemawashi-toyota-production-system

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Ger’s Learning Notes #7 – Myth busting

Ger’s Learning Notes #7 – Myth busting

In our days of ‘alternative facts’ I think myth busting is needed more than ever. So let’s bring in some fine examples of myth busting for learning professionals. – Cheers – Ger

Posted on April 21, 2017.

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(1) Attention and the 8 second attention span by Patti Shank

What’s it about?
There is this popular idea that the human attention span has shrunk from 12 to 8 seconds. So what? The idea also states that goldfish have a 9 second attention span!

Why read it?

  • Patti Shank does some mythbusting here in a very clear and fundamental way – as only Patti Shank can do.
  • She delivers us a clear 5-level model to better understand attention.
  • She provides us her first tips on how to use the conclusions in learning design – and the promise for a follow-up article on ‘designing for attention’, next month.

Where to find it?
https://elearningindustry.com/8-second-attention-span-organizational-learning

Josh Kaufman the first 20 hours

(2) The first 20 hours – how to learn anything by Josh Kaufman

What’s it about?
The idea of the 10.000 hours rule to become an expert is too simple to be true. As Josh Kaufman shows us often good is good enough without becoming an expert. In these cases a 20 hour learning approach might do the job.

Why read it?

  • It gives great background info on the 10.000 hour rule and explains the original research on ‘deliberate practice’ by Anders Ericsson.
  • It’s a practical and positive way to reframe our thoughts that we can learn a lot in 20 hours.
  • It explains the 4 building blocks of how to get the most out of the 20 hours learning approach.

Where to find it?
https://youtu.be/5MgBikgcWnY

Game controller learning note

(3) Five games every e-learning professional should play by Ryan Tracey

What’s it about?
Ryan Tracey does some mythbusting here around gaming. He shows gaming has become mainstream and not an activity exclusive for young folks. He advises that you, being learning professional, should be gaming.

Why read it?

  • While gaming has become mainstream and a part of life for many people, learning designers should be aware of the power of these games and how they can be useful in learning design.
  • I agree with Ryan that the best way to explore is to start doing – so play the game and experience the experience.
  • Ryan is so kind to share his 5 favorite games and his opinion how they relate to learning.

Where to find it?
https://ryan2point0.wordpress.com/2017/04/03/5-games-every-e-learning-professional-should-play/

Learning nugget 4 mythbusting

(4) Two persistent myths about teaching and learning by Bonni Stachowiak

What’s it about?
Bonni Stachowiak debunks two persistent myths related to learning: ‘learning styles’ and ‘the learning pyramid’.

Why read it?

  • Bonni is sincere in her approach sharing that she took the myths for granted earlier in her career. That creates a connection to the reader: didn’t we all?
  • After a brief explanation, links to additional resources are shared in this post providing more background info.
  • Bonni puts the conclusions in perspective and gives direction on how to go forward.

Where to find it?
http://teachinginhighered.com/2017/02/01/2-persistent-myths-teaching-learning/

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Ger’s Learning Notes #6 – Choosing ‘and’ over ‘or’

Choosing ‘and’ over ‘or’ – When discussions focus on formal or informal learning, on online or classroom training, on performance support or learning, it always triggers me to redefine the discussion and explore ‘and’. How can we find the most effective solution of formal and informal learning, of online and classroom training of performance support and learning? I hope these notes will support your professional ‘and’ approach (and inspire you, and help you get results, and….) – Cheers, Ger

Posted on April 7, 2017.

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(1) The Yin and Yang of Formal and Informal Learning by Allison Rossett and Frank Nguyen

What’s it about?
You’ll find a performance support tool created as a questionnaire with 15 questions. It will give you advice to adjust your approach to a better yin/yang of formal/informal learning for your situation. A link to a background article is included.

Why read it?

  • The questionnaire and article are from two highly valued thought leaders in the learning industry
  • It’s a perfect example of AND: a performance support tool combining a questionnaire with an advise and a background article
  • You can use it multiple times – it is a great way to check when you start a new project related to learning. The questions might suggest an assessment at an organizational level but can be used project by project (also within the same organization)

Where to find it?
http://frankn.net/yinyang/

(2) Instructional Design is not dead! By Shannon Tipton

What’s it about?
Shannon Tipton shows that the role of Instructional Designer is evolving – like many professional roles. New technologies are only a major threat for those who don’t adjust, it opens up new possibilities for those who find a professional way to incorporate them in their work.

Why read it?

  • ‘Learning Rebel’ Shannon Tipton focusses on ‘evolve’ instead of ‘extinct’ when exploring the instructional designer’s role – a nice AND approach
  • She shows the silliness of speaking in absolutes and shows concrete opportunities to find new ‘blends’ and to stay relevant as an instructional designer
  • You will feel (re)energised by reading the positive perspectives and concrete tips! (Thanks Shannon!!)

Where to find it?
https://learningrebels.com/2017/03/23/1723/

(3) Beware online ‘filter bubbles’ – TED video by Eli Pariser

What’s it about?
Eli Pariser shows the downside of all things ‘personalisation’ on the internet. The algorithms of Google, Facebook and Netflix – to name a few – create a ‘filter bubble’ reinforcing our preferences and filtering out other resources. Not so good for ‘and’.

Why watch it?

  • Personalisation sounds attractive: a provider that shows us information first that seems to be most relevant for us based on our search history but as Pariser shows also has it’s downsides.
  • It makes you more aware of the possible filter bubbles around you and how they might affect you as a learning professional – and give you ideas to ‘break free’.
  • It might create awareness and a reason for reflection for you as a learning designer: does my design possibly influence the ‘filter bubble’ of learners and is that OK?

Where to find it?
https://www.ted.com/talks/eli_pariser_beware_online_filter_bubbles#t-59753

(4) AI and Humans: Focussing on what we can achieve together by Professor Barry Smyth

What’s it about?
Barry Smyth shows the positive possibilities and concrete examples of humans and AI working together. A more realistic and well informed point of view. Very relevant for every professional – also every learning professional.

Why read it?

  • By thinking in terms of humans or AI we only get what Smyth calls ‘dystopian fever’, feeling afraid AI will take over all our jobs soon.
  • The perspective of AI working together with humans is much more realistic as Smyth shows us with concrete examples and from his well informed perspective.
  • There is a huge opportunity for learning professionals in this – people need to learn to work together effectively with AI – who’s going to facilitate them?

Where to find it?
https://betanews.com/2017/03/29/ai-and-humans-should-work-together/

Ger’s Learning Notes #5 – Tips

Best tip, golden tip, ultimate best tip, number one tip, and expert tips. We all like tips. This week a new spring arrived (pun intended) and to celebrate that I thought the best way to do so is to focus my notes on tips. Apply one tip per day and the profit will stay! – Cheers, Ger

Posted on March 24, 2017.

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(1) Release your inner Franklin: 4 tips for a lifelong learning strategy by Jackie Nagel

What’s it about?
The high pace of change in today’s world increases the need for continuous learning. This blog presents a strategy for continuous learning based on the behaviors of inventor Ben Franklin.

Why read it?

  • You can take the four tips into consideration when designing learning journeys to help your learners understand how to learn.
  • Use it yourself: how about your own lifelong learning system?
  • Reading tip: the intro is quite long – the core message starts at the header ‘How to develop a Lifelong Learning System’.
  • There is an extra tip at the end that of the blog (it’s called ‘Say Ahhhhh…’)

Where to find it?
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jackie-nagel/release-your-inner-frankl_b_14233582.html 

(2) How to create Sticky Learning by Bravetta Hassell

What’s it about?
You’ll find 6 tips to make learning sticky based on marketing insights

Why read it?

  • Like it or not, the fact is that in our content rich world there is strong competition to attract people’s attention – we have to compete as learning content providers.
  • It’s refreshing to learn from and apply insights from other professions – from marketeers in this case.
  • The 6 tips can be easily remembered as they form the acronym S.U.C.C.E.S. (now, isn’t that sticky?!)

Where to find it?
http://www.clomedia.com/2017/03/01/37585/

(3) Seven tips to create effective blended learning by Christopher Pappas

What’s it about?
The blog gives ideas on how to integrate both synchronous and asynchronous learning in your design.

Why read it?

  • The 7 tips offer are a good mix of design principles presented in a logical order.
  • Each tip is well described with enough depth while still being compact.
  • You’ll find hyperlinks in the text to guide you to additional relevant resources and even lists of additional tips for some tips.

Where to find it?
https://elearningindustry.com/7-tips-create-effective-blended-elearning-strategy

(4) Nine ways to use video in online training by Karla Gutierrez

What’s it about?
Some really practical tips on how to create video for training plus links to interesting apps.

Why read it?

  • The blog starts with a good explanation why video can be very effective for learning
  • The tips are very practical and easy to use – they instantly inspired me to want to do more with video.
  • Some links to smart tools and apps are included so you’ll have all you need to get started.

Where to find it?
http://info.shiftelearning.com/blog/9-ways-to-use-video-in-your-online-training-courses

Ger’s Learning Notes #4 – Deep and Fundamental

Deep and fundamental…

I sometimes miss that these days. I feel challenged by the fast paced world to take the ‘quick & dirty’ approach. Do you? Now I can hear you think: hey Ger, how about ‘deep and fundamental’ when it’s about your learning notes? Good question! I’m ready for that, here are 4 new ‘deep notes’. 

Posted on March 10, 2017.

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(1) A Quest for Deep by Neil Von Heupt (Divergent Learning Blog)

What’s it about?
Neil starts with some punch lines: ‘I miss deep. I know it’s still out there, somewhere, but it’s been harder and harder to pursue and find.’

Why read it?

  • He gives some great suggestions to ‘find deep’ – how about: ‘ take time…..’
  • I very much like his ‘creative broad approach’ to find deep
  • In a world that speeds up it seems so hard to slow down once in a while – and we need that for ‘deep’
  • It inspires you to create time to find deep

Where to find it?
https://divergentlearning.wordpress.com/2017/03/01/a-quest-for-deep/

(2) Seminal Papers in Educational Psychology by Paul A. Kirschner – (Read & Keep!)

What’s it about?
Kirschners observation is that young academics often don’t “know the masters”. (I want to add that the same goes for practitioners). To solve this he crowdsourced seminal articles within his community of educational researchers and created an alphabetic (long!) list.

Why read it?

  • Review the list quickly to get an overview of what is in there because it is a lot!
  • You will find an abstract and a link to the original paper
  • Use the list to create your ‘moments of professional depth’ on a regular basis
  • Be sure to keep this list in a safe place – it will be a valuable resource for many years

Where to find it?
https://3starlearningexperiences.wordpress.com/2017/02/28/seminal-papers-in-educational-psychology/

(3) How to Organise for Deep Learning Online (Video by Joitske Hulsebosch and Joke van Alten)

What’s it about?
Joitske and Joke asked 5 thought leaders what is needed for deep learning online. They present their thoughts in 4.22 minutes

Why watch it?

  • The question seems to have this interesting paradox in it: ‘deep’ and ‘online’
  • In the answers you will find some interesting overlap as well as different perspectives
  • When you ask a good question to 5 thought leaders the answers might give you a ‘deep dive’ in only 4.22 minutes. So this is very much ‘the medium is the message’

Where to find it?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LaThPW0uIvI

(Embedded in blog post: http://www.joitskehulsebosch.nl/2017/02/08/hoe-organiseer-je-diep-leren-online/)

(4) What’s the secret of a successful learning technology implementation? By Don Taylor

What’s it about?
Don Taylor asked himself: ‘What matters most in implementing a learning technology?’

Why read it?

  • Don took a ‘deep dive’ of a year of research to find the answers to his questions for his new book
  • This post gives one answer:  process (and that is not enough)
  • The post explains 4 deepening elements to make it a successful process
  • Follow up posts on each of the 4 elements will become available (and of course the book!)

Where to find it?
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/four-essentials-successful-learning-technology-donald-h-taylor

Ger’s Learning Notes #3 – Storytelling

This edition of the learning notes is inspired by the art of storytelling. Posted on February 24, 2017.

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(1) The Art of Storytelling course announced by SFGate

What’s it about?
Storytelling is one of the oldest ‘technologies’ for learning. In our data rich / data overloaded society we see a revival of storytelling as an effective learning approach.

Why read it?

  • In this post you will find the link to the free online course ‘The Art of Storytelling’ provided by Pixar studios.
  • Pixar is the organisation that made storytelling an art (again) in modern day.
  • Storytelling ‘is hot’ and can be a very useful ingredient in many learning programs.
  • It’s a nice way to experience learning at Khan Academy.   


Where to find it?
http://blog.sfgate.com/techchron/2017/02/16/now-you-can-take-pixars-the-art-of-storytelling-course-for-free/

(2) Cognitive Overload and Learning by Margie Meacham

What’s it about?
We know from brain science that our short term memory can get overloaded easily, thus hindering us in learning. Learning designers need to be aware of this and take it into account when designing learning. There are some concrete ideas on how to overcome cognitive overload.

Why read it?

  • Margie Meacham first explains 3 types of cognitive overload in a clear way.
  • You’ll also find 8 practical tips to avoid the pitfalls.
  • Margie is a thought leader in the field of brain science related to learning and writer of the book ‘Brain Matters’.

Where to find it?
https://learningtogo.info/2017/02/16/tmi-cognitive-overload-and-learning

(3) Microlearning is much more than a buzzword by Tim Buff (on TrainingZone)

What’s it about?
An exploration of what micro learning is and what the benefits are for organisations and learners.

Why read it?

  • Micro learning is a buzz word at this moment.
  • My suggestion: when there is buzz, try to find good information behind the buzz.
  • Tim Buff gives a clear overview of what micro learning and its benefits.
  • Read the benefits to know when to use micro learning and when not.

Where to find it?
http://www.trainingzone.co.uk/community/blogs/timbuff/microlearning-much-more-than-a-buzzword

(4) Lifelong learning is good for your health, your wallet and your social life. By John  Coleman in Harvard Business Review

What’s it about?
John Coleman shows in this well documented post what the benefits of lifelong learning are and why. The post delivers what the title suggests.

Why read it?

  • We have to be aware of the fact that two major trends will impact us.
  • We are living longer lives, meaning we have to work longer and…
  • …the decreasing half time of knowledge means we have to learn more often during our lives.
  • Being aware of the benefits of lifelong learning in this positive post might make that easier.


Where to find it?

https://hbr.org/2017/02/lifelong-learning-is-good-for-your-health-your-wallet-and-your-social-life

Ger’s Learning Notes #2 – Learning Technologies

This edition of the learning notes is inspired by my visit of London’s Learning Technologies 2017 (February 1-2).

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David Kelly’s Curated Backchannel Resources

What’s it about?
David Kelly ‘scans’ the Twitter backchannel of every major Learning and Development conference. He curates the most relevant and useful resources which he shares in an overview. It is a great service and delivers a useful repository to both those who did and did not attend the event. This one is from the Learning Technology Conference 2017.

Why read it?

  • Get an idea of the most important trends, messages and insights of both keynotes.
  • Find relevant resources of any sessions.
  • Get to know the work of David Kelly and see how you can benefit – all year long.


Where to find it?

http://davidkelly.me/2017/02/2017-learning-technologies-conference-expo-backchannel-lt17uk/

Moderating a Social MOOC by Petra Peeters and Marlo Kengen

What’s it about?
Petra Peeters and Marlo Kengen share their experience on designing and moderating a Social MOOC resulting in some very relevant and useful tips for moderators.

Why read it?

  • MOOCs are around for some time now and discussed widely but not so much from the moderator’s point of view.
  • Social Learning can be of big added value when applied in a MOOC with good moderators as key success factor.
  • Benefit from the lessons learned as covered in this post (part 2.)

Where to find it?
http://viewer.zmags.com/publication/c492d1b9#/c492d1b9/44

Learning Technology Map 2017 by Julian Stodd

What’s it about?
Julian Stodd provides a great overview of Learning Technologies and shares his reflections and advice – as always, including is awesome hand-drawn graphics.

Why read it?

  • The idea of ‘Light’ and ‘Heavy’ technology as Julian presents is a very useful distinction.
  • The message to focus on ‘learning methodology’ instead of technology is very relevant.
  • The conclusion to strive for a broad ecosystem that utilises both ‘heavy’ and ‘light’ learning technology to stay ‘fluid’ is one to understand well and keep top-of-mind.

Where to find it?
https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/learning-technology-map-2017-julian-stodd

7 Learning Trends in 2017: Novel or Norm? by Sharon Boller

What’s it about?
Sharon Boller gives a very interesting perspective on trends. She first looks back on trends from 1998 and their actual status. Sharon then reviews the actual trends by creating two categories: ‘emerging’ trends and ‘established’ trends.

Why read it?

  • It is interesting to review ‘vintage’ trends and realise what really happened: This creates a refreshing perspective on current trends.
  • It can be fuzzy and frightening to review trends and to understand how to apply them. Making the distinction between ‘emerging’ and ‘established’ trends is very useful for this process.


Where to find it?

http://www.elearninglearning.com/edition/monthly-micro-learning-learning-technologies-2017-01

Ger’s Learning Notes #1

The Serious
eLearning Manifesto

What’s it about?
The authors experience an ambition and some frustration about the professional level off all the ‘elearning stuff’ that is out there. The gathered 8 characteristics and 22 guiding principles to create Serious eLearning and to elevate elearning to the height of its promise.


Why read it?

  • It’s a fundamental resourse for every professional in eLearning
  • An initiative by 4 important and very experienced ThoughtLeaders (Julie Dirksen, Will Talheimer, Clark Quinn, Michael Allen)
  • It will help you evolving to a higher level of professionalism (if you apply it!)


Where to find it?

www.elearningmanifesto.org

The Training Project: cartoon by Arun Pradhan

What’s it about?
This cartoon is very ‘spot on’ about what often happens within an organisation. It shows in a very clear and funny way how easy it is to get distracted and how thing can become complex while an effective, simple and cheap solution is available. Made by Arun Pradhan: an outstanding Performance Improvement & Learning professional and shares great content. He is also very good at drawing and thus able to make his own cartoons!


Why read it?

  • It can be performance support for yourselves – to ‘have a look in the mirror’ once in a while. Am I doing the right things?
  • You can use it to facilitate discussions with stakeholders who are ‘pushy’ and want their own (silly) solution implemented asap


Where to find it?

Design4performance blog

Will automation take away all our jobs?
TED-talk by David Autor

What’s it about?
Isn’t it strange that we fear so much about losing jobs by automation and robots while at the same time everybody seems so busy and has to work harder as ever before? David Autor sheds a light on this question.


Why watch it?

  • You will be glad understanding the fundamental mechanisms about work and jobs as David Autor explains


Where to find it?

TED talk – David Autor ‘Will automation take away all our jobs?’

Snapchatification of learning, Podcast by Martin Couzins and Nigel Paine

What’s it about?
We might laugh about snapchat and see it as a playful app for kids. But looking at the huge numbers of users and chats, it invites for a closer look.


Why listen to it?

  • Open your mind for new ideas
  • Martin and Nigel are always able to clarify how more general themes and trends are important for learning professionals.


Where to find it?

Audio Boom – Nigel Paine and Martin Couzins

Ger Driesen picture

Hooked on learning

I hope my learning notes will inspire you and keep you craving for more. Have questions or comments? Feel free to drop me an email or tweet (@GerDriesen).

Ger

Ger Driesen
Learning Innovation Leader

© 2017 ANEWSPRING