Ger’s Learning Notes #7 – Myth busting

In our days of ‘alternative facts’ I think myth busting is needed more than ever. So let’s bring in some fine examples of myth busting for learning professionals. – Cheers – Ger

Posted on April 21, 2017.

(1) Attention and the 8 second attention span by Patti Shank

What’s it about?
There is this popular idea that the human attention span has shrunk from 12 to 8 seconds. So what? The idea also states that goldfish have a 9 second attention span!

Why read it?

  • Patti Shank does some mythbusting here in a very clear and fundamental way – as only Patti Shank can do.
  • She delivers us a clear 5-level model to better understand attention.
  • She provides us her first tips on how to use the conclusions in learning design – and the promise for a follow-up article on ‘designing for attention’, next month.

Where to find it?
https://elearningindustry.com/8-second-attention-span-organizational-learning

Josh Kaufman the first 20 hours

(2) The first 20 hours – how to learn anything by Josh Kaufman

What’s it about?
The idea of the 10.000 hours rule to become an expert is too simple to be true. As Josh Kaufman shows us often good is good enough without becoming an expert. In these cases a 20 hour learning approach might do the job.

Why read it?

  • It gives great background info on the 10.000 hour rule and explains the original research on ‘deliberate practice’ by Anders Ericsson.
  • It’s a practical and positive way to reframe our thoughts that we can learn a lot in 20 hours.
  • It explains the 4 building blocks of how to get the most out of the 20 hours learning approach.

Where to find it?
https://youtu.be/5MgBikgcWnY

(3) Five games every e-learning professional should play by Ryan Tracey

What’s it about?
Ryan Tracey does some mythbusting here around gaming. He shows gaming has become mainstream and not an activity exclusive for young folks. He advises that you, being learning professional, should be gaming.

Why read it?

  • While gaming has become mainstream and a part of life for many people, learning designers should be aware of the power of these games and how they can be useful in learning design.
  • I agree with Ryan that the best way to explore is to start doing – so play the game and experience the experience.
  • Ryan is so kind to share his 5 favorite games and his opinion how they relate to learning.

Where to find it?
https://ryan2point0.wordpress.com/2017/04/03/5-games-every-e-learning-professional-should-play/

(4) Two persistent myths about teaching and learning by Bonni Stachowiak

What’s it about?
Bonni Stachowiak debunks two persistent myths related to learning: ‘learning styles’ and ‘the learning pyramid’.

Why read it?

  • Bonni is sincere in her approach sharing that she took the myths for granted earlier in her career. That creates a connection to the reader: didn’t we all?
  • After a brief explanation, links to additional resources are shared in this post providing more background info.
  • Bonni puts the conclusions in perspective and gives direction on how to go forward.

Where to find it?
http://teachinginhighered.com/2017/02/01/2-persistent-myths-teaching-learning/

Read More

Ger’s Learning Notes #6 – Choosing ‘and’ over ‘or’

Choosing ‘and’ over ‘or’ – When discussions focus on formal or informal learning, on online or classroom training, on performance support or learning, it always triggers me to redefine the discussion and explore ‘and’. How can we find the most effective solution of formal and informal learning, of online and classroom training of performance support and learning? I hope these notes will support your professional ‘and’ approach (and inspire you, and help you get results, and….) – Cheers, Ger

Posted on April 7, 2017.

(1) The Yin and Yang of Formal and Informal Learning by Allison Rossett and Frank Nguyen

What’s it about?
You’ll find a performance support tool created as a questionnaire with 15 questions. It will give you advice to adjust your approach to a better yin/yang of formal/informal learning for your situation. A link to a background article is included.

Why read it?

  • The questionnaire and article are from two highly valued thought leaders in the learning industry
  • It’s a perfect example of AND: a performance support tool combining a questionnaire with an advise and a background article
  • You can use it multiple times – it is a great way to check when you start a new project related to learning. The questions might suggest an assessment at an organizational level but can be used project by project (also within the same organization)

Where to find it?
http://frankn.net/yinyang/

(2) Instructional Design is not dead! By Shannon Tipton

What’s it about?
Shannon Tipton shows that the role of Instructional Designer is evolving – like many professional roles. New technologies are only a major threat for those who don’t adjust, it opens up new possibilities for those who find a professional way to incorporate them in their work.

Why read it?

  • ‘Learning Rebel’ Shannon Tipton focusses on ‘evolve’ instead of ‘extinct’ when exploring the instructional designer’s role – a nice AND approach
  • She shows the silliness of speaking in absolutes and shows concrete opportunities to find new ‘blends’ and to stay relevant as an instructional designer
  • You will feel (re)energised by reading the positive perspectives and concrete tips! (Thanks Shannon!!)

Where to find it?
https://learningrebels.com/2017/03/23/1723/

(3) Beware online ‘filter bubbles’ – TED video by Eli Pariser

What’s it about?
Eli Pariser shows the downside of all things ‘personalisation’ on the internet. The algorithms of Google, Facebook and Netflix – to name a few – create a ‘filter bubble’ reinforcing our preferences and filtering out other resources. Not so good for ‘and’.

Why watch it?

  • Personalisation sounds attractive: a provider that shows us information first that seems to be most relevant for us based on our search history but as Pariser shows also has it’s downsides.
  • It makes you more aware of the possible filter bubbles around you and how they might affect you as a learning professional – and give you ideas to ‘break free’.
  • It might create awareness and a reason for reflection for you as a learning designer: does my design possibly influence the ‘filter bubble’ of learners and is that OK?

Where to find it?
https://www.ted.com/talks/eli_pariser_beware_online_filter_bubbles#t-59753

(4) AI and Humans: Focussing on what we can achieve together by Professor Barry Smyth

What’s it about?
Barry Smyth shows the positive possibilities and concrete examples of humans and AI working together. A more realistic and well informed point of view. Very relevant for every professional – also every learning professional.

Why read it?

  • By thinking in terms of humans or AI we only get what Smyth calls ‘dystopian fever’, feeling afraid AI will take over all our jobs soon.
  • The perspective of AI working together with humans is much more realistic as Smyth shows us with concrete examples and from his well informed perspective.
  • There is a huge opportunity for learning professionals in this – people need to learn to work together effectively with AI – who’s going to facilitate them?

Where to find it?
https://betanews.com/2017/03/29/ai-and-humans-should-work-together/

Read More

Ger’s Learning Notes #5 – Tips

Best tip, golden tip, ultimate best tip, number one tip, and expert tips. We all like tips. This week a new spring arrived (pun intended) and to celebrate that I thought the best way to do so is to focus my notes on tips. Apply one tip per day and the profit will stay! – Cheers, Ger

Posted on March 24, 2017.

(1) Release your inner Franklin: 4 tips for a lifelong learning strategy by Jackie Nagel

What’s it about?
The high pace of change in today’s world increases the need for continuous learning. This blog presents a strategy for continuous learning based on the behaviors of inventor Ben Franklin.

Why read it?

  • You can take the four tips into consideration when designing learning journeys to help your learners understand how to learn.
  • Use it yourself: how about your own lifelong learning system?
  • Reading tip: the intro is quite long – the core message starts at the header ‘How to develop a Lifelong Learning System’.
  • There is an extra tip at the end that of the blog (it’s called ‘Say Ahhhhh…’)

Where to find it?
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jackie-nagel/release-your-inner-frankl_b_14233582.html 

(2) How to create Sticky Learning by Bravetta Hassell

What’s it about?
You’ll find 6 tips to make learning sticky based on marketing insights

Why read it?

  • Like it or not, the fact is that in our content rich world there is strong competition to attract people’s attention – we have to compete as learning content providers.
  • It’s refreshing to learn from and apply insights from other professions – from marketeers in this case.
  • The 6 tips can be easily remembered as they form the acronym S.U.C.C.E.S. (now, isn’t that sticky?!)

Where to find it?
http://www.clomedia.com/2017/03/01/37585/

(3) Seven tips to create effective blended learning by Christopher Pappas

What’s it about?
The blog gives ideas on how to integrate both synchronous and asynchronous learning in your design.

Why read it?

  • The 7 tips offer are a good mix of design principles presented in a logical order.
  • Each tip is well described with enough depth while still being compact.
  • You’ll find hyperlinks in the text to guide you to additional relevant resources and even lists of additional tips for some tips.

Where to find it?
https://elearningindustry.com/7-tips-create-effective-blended-elearning-strategy

(4) Nine ways to use video in online training by Karla Gutierrez

What’s it about?
Some really practical tips on how to create video for training plus links to interesting apps.

Why read it?

  • The blog starts with a good explanation why video can be very effective for learning
  • The tips are very practical and easy to use – they instantly inspired me to want to do more with video.
  • Some links to smart tools and apps are included so you’ll have all you need to get started.

Where to find it?
http://info.shiftelearning.com/blog/9-ways-to-use-video-in-your-online-training-courses

Read More
page  1  of  3

Ger Driesen

Hooked on learning

I hope my learning notes will inspire you and keep you craving for more. Have questions or comments? Feel free to drop me an email or tweet (@GerDriesen).

Ger

Ger Driesen
Learning Innovation Leader

© 2017 ANEWSPRING