Webinar:
Start with who

Dec 12, 2019 – Online webinar

Webinar:
Start with who

Dec 12, 2019 – Online
13.00 – 14.00

For many years, professionals worldwide have been inspired by Simon Sinek’s ‘Start with Why’. Would this approach also be useful for learning and development? In this free, interactive webinar, Ger Driesen explains why he wants to ‘transform’ it into ‘Start with Who’. Join in and learn all about ‘the Golden Circle of Learning Design’. Definitely interesting for learning designers.

This webinar is free, register only

Interested?
Sign-up for the webinar

For many years, we have benefited from Simon Sinek’s ‘Start with why’. This inspiring idea also guided learning designers in their approach although it originates from a leadership and marketing perspective. In the era of Learner eXperience Design, it’s time to put the learner back in the centre of our design. To do so, we have to replace the ‘why’ with ‘who’ and create the ‘Golden Circle for learning design’.

Why ‘Start with why’ is a pitfall for learning design:

  • Start with WHO to really understand the people that have to get the job done;
  • Explore different types of WHAT kind of ‘jobs to be done’ for real empathy;
  • Understand the characteristics of the context WHERE the job takes place.

Use your understanding to design the right blend of learning and performance support interventions and modalities

Even more inspiration about learning?

Here are some interesting blogs from Ger to get you started.

Ger’s Learning Notes #49: Research

There is a fundamental way of learning that we often seem to overlook; it’s called research. I remember the first research I did as a student for our national weather service, the KNMI. We conducted serious evaluation research around one of the important internal courses they did those days.

Ger’s Learning Notes #48: Kaizen (Continuous Improvement)

My colleague, Roy, went on holiday to Japan recently — a well-deserved vacation. I was a little bit envious to be honest, but as the Japanese say, ‘shouganai’ (it is what it is). I haven’t been to Japan (yet), but I worked as a training manager for a Japanese company. That was an amazing experience, and it taught me so many things about the Japanese way of looking at work. I dare to say that after all these years, it still inspires me at work at least once a week.

Ger’s Learning Notes #47: Learning Impact

Have you ever had a colleague who didn’t want to make an impact? I have never experienced that. I guess we all hope that our work has a positive impact in the end. Hard work doesn’t really do the trick; smart work does.

This episode is packed with resources by the best of the best. The resources are evidence-based too, to help you create the positive impact that you are aiming for. Learning is too important to leave it to chance. Designing learning is not only a beautiful and purposeful profession but also a one with huge responsibility. You can do it if you know how and apply what works based on evidence. I hope this will help you.

The perspective of Mirjam Neelen on the skills obsession

Constantly upskilling, reskilling and acquiring new skills to keep up in a world that is changing rapidly. It’s considered normal nowadays. How do experts view this skills obsession? And how can training providers capitalise on the opportunities this brings?

In a series of four interviews, I talk with leading names in the field.

Mirjam Neelen from Novartis thinks upskilling and reskilling should have always been a priority.

Ger’s Learning Notes #46: Learning Objectives

Really?! An episode about learning objectives?! Yes, really!

Learning objectives is the 101 topic of learning, so forgive me if you think that I question your intelligence. That will never be my intention. Learning objectives seems like a topic that is so self-evident that it doesn’t need any attention. And that’s why it does.

The perspective of Dani Johnson on the skills obsession

Constantly upskilling, reskilling and acquiring new skills to keep up in a world that is changing rapidly. It’s considered normal nowadays. How do experts view this skills obsession? And how can training providers capitalise on the opportunities this brings?

In a series of four interviews, Ger Driesen talks with leading names in the field.

It’s the availability of data that makes L&D departments active players in the strategy of an organisation, says Dani Johnson of RedThread Research. That comes with some challenges.